How to Elevate your Brand to the Next Level

Do you feel like you’re stuck and not leveling up to your full potential? Are you tired of still being in the same place you were over a year ago or even longer? Sick of low or non-existing sales? Are you finally ready to make a drastic change to reach your goals? Then this post is for you!

When my clients and myself started taking these 3 steps, we saw exponential growth in clients, sales, productivity, motivation, network.

1. Invest in your Business: That means, allocate funds towards a professional website, a real logo, labels, packaging, a storefront/showroom, etc.. Hire professionals to do what you can’t. If you’re a fashion designer, hire models and a great photographer to capture your collection. Employ someone in charge of just sales & marketing, hire an accountant that keeps up with your business finances. This will free up your time and allow you to focus on designing and the bigger picture of your business goals. If you’re a busy stylist who can’t keep up with social media hire someone to manage it. Invest in your education via classes and webinars. The Fashion World is one of the fastest-changing industries, it’s very challenging to stay abreast of all the changes and trends. But thanks to the internet you can attend online classes, webinars, masterclasses, or even get certified in areas such as social media, fashion marketing, Fashion Business Management, etc. without having to leave the comfort of your home. Hootsuite Academy and Fashion Brain Academy offer great courses and so do Fashion Institutes. I personally will offer an online class in October for Fashionpreneurs that are serious about taking their business to the next level but can’t afford to hire a marketing professional yet. You can sign up for the newsletter HERE and we will email you when it’s time to register. Once you enhance your expertise you will be better prepared to cater to your clients and understand the ecosystem of the fashion industry. There is also financial gain in offering a superior product/service, the more qualified you are the more you can charge. Another benefit of investing in your business is that you come across more professionally and your audience will take you more seriously. Also, invest time in reading about the Fashion Industry. I created a habit of reading Fashion Newsletters before I get started with my day. The ones I recommend are Business of Fashion, WWD, Vogue Business, and PR Couture. See those line items as investments in your business that will pay off in the long term and enable you to reach higher levels. If you’re not willing to invest and believe in yourself why should others?

2. Be Consistent: Your quality of work needs to be consistent with all clients, products, events, etc. This will establish your reputation, create accountability, and build your brand identity. Be consistent in the quality and frequency of the content you put out on social media and online. Don’t just post to post but instead add value for your audience. Also, consistency is the only way to measure if a new strategy is working or not. Be consistent in your leadership as well. If you say you only care about results and not how your employees achieve them you can’t start micro-managing them all of a sudden. It is said that it takes 21 days to form a new habit, so when trying something new try to maintain it for at least 21 days.

3. Surround Yourself with Positive Energy: There is nothing more draining than being around negative people that suck the life out of you. Surround yourself with like-minded go-getters who will motivate you to keep going and to level up. If you don’t have any friends that are part of the entrepreneurial lifestyle join groups or attend conferences. Great groups to join are FGI, DIFFA, your local Entrepreneurship Center, Start-Up Fashion, and Fashion Mingle. There are additional programs such as GC4Women, Tory Burch Foundation, The SBA, and Accelerator Programs such as Y Combinator, that provide small businesses with mentorship, consulting, and funding opportunities.

I would love to hear from you. What do you struggle with the most in your business? What’s holding you back? Which investments are difficult to make in your business? Or which step(s) mentioned in my post would you like to implement next? You can comment below or email me at Sschirru@dynamicallybpr.com.

XOXO,

Dynamically Branded

Why Brands don’t want to work with you

Over the past 10 years I have worked for and with several brands such as Curls, Shea Moisture, Swarowski, Google, Uber, Hennessy, NYFW, Coca-Cola, Omni Hotels, Stila, Covergirl etc. I’m always being asked the question of how to receive sponsorships from brands. Some people wonder why brands don’t want to work with them or what they’re doing wrong with their pitching approach.

Here some pointers why brands don’t want to work with you:

  1. You don’t bring anything to the table: Whenever you approach a brand you have to make yourself interesting to them. What’s special about you? How will you help them make a sale or increase their popularity? Do you have an engaged audience? Do you create original or creative content? Do you have a unique perspective or a one-of-a-kind look? Are you involved with an event that could touch many potential customers in one sweep?
  2. You don’t target their target demographic: Let’s say for example you want to approach a premium brand but have only been promoting and working with lower end brands it’s very unlikely you will get a deal with that higher end brand.
  3. You’re unprofessional: The first impression counts whenever you are trying to contact brands. Always approach a brand with professional pictures, a media kit, highlights of what makes you special, and your specific value proposition. Also, clean up your social media since these channels will be the first ones they will check out. No brand wants to see an endless collection of selfies, you turning up in every other picture, or captions with foul language. They want to see that you will actually represent a brand and make them shine in the best light.
  4. You’ve been going hard for their competition: Even if you approached a company professionally and did everything right your proposal might still be rejected due to prior strong advocacy of a competing product. So you either have to let some time pass between the competitor and the new brand or take those posts off .

I hope this helps if you don’t know how to create a media-kit or a value proposition in your pitch feel free to send me an email sschirru@dynamicallybpr.com and I will give you advice.

XOXO,

Dynamically Branded

Smith II “SS 17” Collection inspired by Police Brutality

Charles Smith II, the visionary and creative mind behind Smith II, did not cease to push the envelope with his latest “Do Not Touch” collection for the Spring/Summer 2017 season. We simply can’t put this artist in a box, every time I think I figured him out he comes up with something new. A new message, new lines, new accessories, new colors and new materials.

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Photo Credits: Demarcus Mitchell

Let’s start with his new message:

His latest collection was inspired by the on-going incidents of racism and police brutality against the African-American community. But his message goes even deeper as to holding our personal space which is often taken for granted at a high value. When we read “Do Not Touch” we automatically take a step back, pay more attention and become more respectful. Smith II wants his clients to feel untouchable when they wear his clothes, not in a cocky way, but in a more individualistic matter. The ultimate goals is to eliminate the necessity to fit in or yearning approval from others.

Charles Smith II practices what he preaches, because he sure doesn’t care about what others think of him by now. His confidence wasn’t a given but instead developed while overcoming a myriad of obstacles ranging from financial hardships to being burned by people in the industry.

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Photo Credits: Demarcus Mitchell

During the runway presentation I loved seeing denim skirts, chokers, asymmetric jackets, lace capes (my favorites) and two piece ensembles. I was also impressed by the color range utilized, we have been used to primarily blacks and whites by Smith II but this collection also included yellow, red and a lovely burgundy.

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Photo Credits: Demarcus Mitchell

Watch the finale walk here:

Do Not Touch raised awareness on socio-political issues and pleased our eye with ready-to-wear fashions while raising funds for DISD scholarships. His audience was so diverse showing that we ALL can come together for a great cause regardless of ethnic, social, economic or political background!

Bravo Charles! Well done!!!